Ezekiel and Patsy

He was a man of some means, so naturally he left behind a Will. It and its ensuing documents provided a great deal of information about the slaves he once owned. The documents were invaluable, but they only told a part of the story. Perhaps it’s well worth knowing, what is known about all the slaves that Thompson Glen owned, not just because that information speaks to Patsy’s ancestry. But it also speaks to the ancestry of others, whose ancestors were slaves and their names might appear here.

In this endeavor, we have to go back to Thompson Glen’s father, James Glen who had resided in Albemarle County, Virginia prior to his move to Surry County, North Carolina. The following record lists the names of the first slaves he brought, the amount of money he paid for them, the date he brought them and whom he brought them from:

(Virginia County Court Records) Deed Abstracts of Albemarle County, Virginia Deed Book #4 - August 9, 1764 - August 12, 1768 Ruth & Sam Sparacio, 1989
(Virginia County Court Records)
Deed Abstracts of Albemarle County, Virginia
Deed Book #4 – August 9, 1764 – August 12, 1768
Ruth & Sam Sparacio, 1989

The primary focus from the above list of slaves, is the slave named Dills. She is believed to be Sukey’s mother, and Patsy’s grandmother.

Some twelve years after James Glen brought Delce and the others, he would pass away. The following is a section of his Will. It tells of how he wanted his slaves to be distributed. Keep in mind, that they all were not listed:

Surry County, North Carolina James Glen, Will Book 1, page 154a March 28, 1777
Surry County, North Carolina
James Glen, Will Book 1, page 154a
March 28, 1777
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